From Addie Washington...

One way to talk about what this year has meant for me, is to talk about ashes. This year Ash Wednesday fell on my birthday, so I celebrated a little differently than usual. A dawning realization as I grow older, is that fires never stop coming in our lives. Whether the challenges, the pruning, and the trials we face feel like God’s refining fire or more like out of control forest-fires, the seasons of life do not seem to ebb or slow down...
— Addie Washington

Read the rest of Addie's reflection here


From ciara rowley...

When I first came to The Road Episcopal Service Corps, I viewed God as a brilliant, essential puzzle piece, the final piece in a dazzling puzzle of my life. Not only would my life be incomplete without this final piece, but the piece couldn’t be placed until all my other pieces were in order: a clean heart, good works, vast knowledge. I imagined God lurking in the wings, waiting for me to get my act together before revealing God’s “divine plan,” or congratulating me on “getting it right.” I knew that God loved me unconditionally, but I didn’t think God was proud of me. I imagined God frustrated with me, clucking His tongue and wondering when I was going to figure it all out. I imagined myself as the Prodigal Son, trying to find my way back home, and God the loving father, eagerly waiting for me with his view towards the horizon...
— Ciara Rowley

Read the rest of Ciara's reflection here


From carlton langford...

The second day of our program we were asked to construct and share a road map of our lives. This was the first of many times that the fellows heard me say, “I’m not good at art. I’m not creative. I over-analyze my creation to the point where my intended expression never gets conveyed.” And this negative, overly-critical comment played out in my design. The map was messy, unoriginal, and incomplete. And so was the content. I focused on superficial past accomplishments, the circumstances surrounding my criminal history, and my inability to find employment or move on with my life...
— Carlton Langford

Read the rest of Carlton's reflection here


From maris kramer...

The other day, I needed to kill time before an event at the Georgia Justice Project down on Edgewood, and I decided to sit by the reflecting pool at the MLK Center. I don’t know how many of you have been before, but Dr. King’s speeches and sermons play on rotation at the pool so you’re constantly surrounded by his voice. As I walked toward the pool, Dr. King was giving the speech he gave in Memphis just before his assassination. The one where he sees the mountaintop. And as I sit down on a bench facing the pool, the audio just silences out of nowhere. I texted Ciara, who I’m sure thought I was kidding instead of being rather superstitious, and asked her what I did to bring about the silence. She said, “Maybe he’s just passing you the mic...
— Maris Kramer

Read the rest of Maris's reflection here


From Alex Keys...

Welcome is a word that can be an automatic response to an expression of thanks, a casual greeting, or even something more meaningful. At the start of the year, we had a list of rules for community life posted on our fridge, one of which went as follows: Welcome others here and presume that you are welcomed. I have taken this phrase to heart and it has been an integral part to my year as a part of the Road. During our second night at the apartment, Laura asked us to share our “life maps” with one another, visual representations of our journeys to that point. With each unique piece of art, my housemates opened up in a way that I have rarely seen complete strangers do...
— Alex Keyes

Read the rest of Alex's reflection here